The Rebuilding Season

This is a joyous time of year, and for the residents at the Upper Room, every ounce of that joy is hard-earned. These men have had some hard years behind them. Some difficult years ahead, too. Recovery is a lifelong journey after all, and the first years are the hardest. The reality is that the stress of the holidays makes December one of the worst months for relapses. But I don’t want to talk about that today.

Today, I want to talk about one of the most joyous things we ever get to witness in this line of work. As you may have heard, addiction is an isolating disease. Many of our residents don’t have any family connections left. Those relationships are strained, if they still exist at all. Rebuilding them is a long and difficult task.

That’s why the most magical thing we ever get to see is when one of our residents spends the holiday season with family for the first time in years. The tenacity, the diligence, and the determination of our men in recovery. The love and forgiveness of their families.These reunions are a special kind of sublime. It’s one of the best things we ever get to see.

And I just wanted to share that with you.

 

Photo credit: Jazzyblue TR on Foter.com / CC BY-NC-ND

For me, I really needed time away from my old environment. I needed a place where people are in recovery and are serious about their recovery, a place where I could fit in and give my newly-found recovery a solid foundation.

anonymous

I’m finally getting better. I'm moving forward.

anonymous

Life is so much better. I had no idea the sweet life I could have.

anonymous

My alcoholism was so out of control and so was my life. I had a loss of trust with people who cared about me. It’s devastating. How do you regain that trust?

anonymous

I came here because of word of mouth about Upper Room. I’ve known about God most of my life, but I did not KNOW God.

anonymous

I've learned a lot about myself through this process. My character has changed. It's not easy, but with help, I know I can do it. It is God's will, not mine.

anonymous

The disease is arrested, not destroyed. Each day you have to decide whether you’re going to live or die – because it will kill you.

anonymous

When you’re in the midst of addiction, you’re also in the midst of loneliness and isolation. It’s hard to shake off. Your defense mechanisms are like a coat that you put on.

anonymous