A lifelong area resident and graduate of John Adams High School, Deborah  got her bachelors from Illinois Wesleyan University, majoring in Art Education. She is the mother of three grown children and grandmother to six young adults and teenagers, as well as an active member of First United Methodist Church.

Though originally hired as Custodial Supervisor, the job has since evolved to also include managing the house, the kitchen and special events, as well as the pantry for new residents. Deborah finds the most important and most satisfying aspect of the job to be the relationship with the residents. She considers being the ‘House Mom’ and sharing this small part of their recovery journey to be both an honor and a privilege.

For me, I really needed time away from my old environment. I needed a place where people are in recovery and are serious about their recovery, a place where I could fit in and give my newly-found recovery a solid foundation.

anonymous

I’m finally getting better. I'm moving forward.

anonymous

Life is so much better. I had no idea the sweet life I could have.

anonymous

My alcoholism was so out of control and so was my life. I had a loss of trust with people who cared about me. It’s devastating. How do you regain that trust?

anonymous

I came here because of word of mouth about Upper Room. I’ve known about God most of my life, but I did not KNOW God.

anonymous

I've learned a lot about myself through this process. My character has changed. It's not easy, but with help, I know I can do it. It is God's will, not mine.

anonymous

The disease is arrested, not destroyed. Each day you have to decide whether you’re going to live or die – because it will kill you.

anonymous

When you’re in the midst of addiction, you’re also in the midst of loneliness and isolation. It’s hard to shake off. Your defense mechanisms are like a coat that you put on.

anonymous